Making sense of science
The author of The Hobbit was also a poet and a medieval philologist who, as part of the process of creating the realm of Middle Earth, also invented highly elaborate imaginary languages. Charles Delattre, a specialist in Greco-Roman languages, literature and mythology, and a contributor to a...
Article
05.22.2017
The first material of its kind, with a thickness of just one atom, graphene has opened the way to the development of other ultra-thin substances. Now being produced and studied in the laboratory, these new materials could find a wide range of applications in...
Article
05.17.2017
Neuroimmunology—or the study of interactions between the nervous and immune systems—is still in its infancy, but it already holds great therapeutic promise, Jean-Philippe Herbeuval and Nikaïa Smith explain.
Opinion
05.18.2017
Article
05.25.2017
Geochemists and paleontologists have cracked the secrets sealed in the calcium isotopes of fossil teeth to reveal why many large marine reptiles vanished from the Earth’s oceans during the mass...
Article
05.09.2017
While we identify odors as being pleasant or unpleasant, we are seldom aware of the complexity of the sensations that they trigger. Researchers are set to fill the gap by investigating this “chemical...
Article
05.01.2017
Ascidians are strange little marine invertebrates shaped like wineskins that can quickly grow new tissue after suffering serious injury. The biological mechanisms underlying this process have barely...
Article
03.16.2017
Already involved in numerous pathologies, the elastic properties of tissues and organs now represent a promising new lead in biological and medical research. Preliminary results point to new types of...
Article
03.10.2017
However mysterious and uncontrollable, dreaming is a brain activity like any other, and one that researchers can look into. Interview with neurologist and sleep specialist Isabelle Arnulf.
Article
03.09.2017
In France, cystic fibrosis affects some 150 newborns each year. While there have already been significant advances in how symptoms are treated, research is now targeting the cause of this fatal...
Article
02.14.2017
With more than 200,000 new cases each year in France, Alzheimer's is the most common neurodegenerative disease. CNRS News reviews recent advances in terms of treatment and diagnosis.
Opinion
02.07.2017
In a recent book, Marc Boulay and Sébastien Steyer set themselves quite a challenge: that of imagining what animals will be like in 10 million years' time. Steyer, a paleontologist, outlines the...
Article
01.26.2017
An expedition to the Kisangani region, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, has yielded surprising findings about a supposedly very rare bat species, the pied butterfly bat, whose black fur with...
Article
01.19.2017
A new study sheds light on how some ant species ingeniously combine vision and memory to find their way back from foraging expeditions—whether walking forward, backward or sideways.
Slideshow
01.18.2017
Discover the 20 scientific images by Canadian researchers presented during the 2016 edition of the competition “La preuve par l’image” (Proof through Images). CNRS Le journal is a partner of...
Article
01.16.2017
Our memory is malleable. So much so that we can even create false memories. Insight into these mechanisms could help us find new ways to understand certain pathological disorders. Neurobiologist...