Making sense of science

Newsletter June 2016

CNRS Logo
View in your browser
Follow us Twitter Facebook Instagram Dailymotion
This month in science (June 2016)
society video
Cave Structures Shed New Light on Neanderthals
Date de parution:  05.25.2016
Archaeology The recent discovery of broken stalagmites arranged in circles in the Bruniquel Cave (southwestern France) indicate that humans started occupying caves much earlier (more than 100 millennia) than previously thought. These man-made structures also rank among the very first in human history and traces of fire show that Neanderthals knew how to use it to navigate dark and enclosed spaces, well before Homo sapiens.
Watch the video
life article
Genetic Scissors for Tailored Neuroscience Solutions
05.11.2016
Neuroscience By making it possible to "surgically" act on DNA, the CRISPR-Cas9 system is not only revolutionizing genome editing techniques, it is paving the way for new and exciting ways to study the brain.
Read the article
life article
Rethinking the Origin of Dogs
06.02.2016
Biology Unlike what most geneticists previously thought, the ancestor of modern-day dogs may not be a hundred percent Asian. Man’s best friend could in fact be a cross between two genetic “relatives,” one that was domesticated in East Asia and the other in Western Europe.
Read the article
Also this month
society article
digital
Bringing Mandela’s Voice Back to Life
05.19.2016
Engineering More than 50 years after Nelson Mandela’s trial, the 230 hours of hearings have been digitized and returned to South Africa—a challenge made possible by a device called the “Archeophone.”
Read the article
life article
digital
The Robot Will See you Now
05.24.2016
Medicine Winner of the startup contest at the 2016 Innorobo international forum in Paris, Axilum Robotics’ TMS-Robot is a huge step forward in magnetic brain-stimulation procedures, pointing to the promising introduction of robotics in the medical field.
Read the article
life article
digital
Emerging Technologies to Fight Alzheimer’s
05.30.2016
Medicine Scientists are stretching the limits of new technology to develop innovative techniques to improve diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as provide care for the increasing number of sufferers.
Read the article
society article
Ancient Naples: the Writing on the Wall
05.16.2016
Archaeology Whether it be temples, statues or artifacts, archaeological remains are irreplaceable testimonies of the past. Yet to those who know how to listen, other, rather unexpected witnesses such as... pollution have a story to tell.
Read the article
society article
Raoul Wallenberg, a Forgotten Hero
05.31.2016
History Seventy-one years after he disappeared in Budapest, the Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, who saved tens of thousands of Jews from deportation by giving them Swedish papers, has been officially declared dead by the government of his country.
Read the article
life article
earth
Exploring Coral's Hidden Biodiversity
05.26.2016
Marine biology The research vessel Tara sets off to the Pacific on a two-year mission to study coral reefs and assess the unprecedented threats from climate change on this fragile ecosystem, home to 30% of our oceans' biodiversity.
Read the article
earth diaporama
In the Heart of the "Furnace"
05.23.2016
Volcanology The Volcanological Observatory of Piton de la Fournaise (OVPF) on Reunion island helps researchers elucidate the mechanisms of one of the world's most active volcanoes.
Access the slideshow
society diaporama
A Mango Harvest with the Baka Pygmies
05.11.2016
Anthropology Deep in the African equatorial forest, the Baka pygmies of Cameroon live in symbiosis with their environment. The anthropologist Laurent Maget joined them during mango harvest season. Depending on the seasons and needs, Pygmies practice hunting, fishing, and gathering.
Access the slideshow
cnrs
cnrsnews.fr
© 2017, CNRS
Terms of use