Making sense of science

Newsletter August 2016

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This month in science (August 2016)
digital article
The Longest Proof in the History of Mathematics
07.20.2016
Mathematics Researchers use computers to create the world's longest proof, and solve a mathematical problem that had remained open for 35 years.
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society article
“Come on, you Reds!” They Shouted in Ancient Games
08.04.2016
History As the Rio Olympics are about to begin, historian Jean-Paul Thuillier discusses the origins of the modern Olympic Games in ancient Greece and Rome.
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space article
Solved: The Mystery of the Martian Moons
07.04.2016
Astronomy The aura of mystery surrounding Mars has long been intensified by its curious pair of moons: Phobos and Deimos, whose origins have remained clouded until now.
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Also this month
digital article
EMS Prizes for French Mathematicians
07.18.2016
Mathematics French mathematicians Hugo Duminil-Copin and Vincent Calvez were awarded prizes by the European Mathematical Society (EMS), whose congress is being held this week in Berlin. Christoph Sorger, director of the National Institute for Mathematical Sciences and their Interactions, looks back at the very...
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society article
When Gestures Improve Speech
07.25.2016
Communication What if the gestures we make when we speak do more than merely underline what we say? What if they also helped our oral expression? Convinced of the intimate connection between gestures and speech, two researchers launched a project to help people with Down syndrome express themselves more easily.
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life article
society
How Many Sexes Are There?
08.01.2016
Biology and Social Sciences The issue of gender verification is not new to competitive sports. Yet how can we define biological sex? And how many sexes are there? As the 2016 Rio Olympic Games get underway, CNRS News explores this sensitive and complicated topic.
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life video
earth
The Viruses that Rule our Oceans
07.08.2016
Biology Every day, marine viruses kill 40% of our oceans’ bacteria. And yet these biological entities are still poorly known. For example, we still know little about their role in the regulation of microalgae, the first link in the food chain that also produces close to a quarter of our planet’s oxygen. We...
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matter article
earth
What Makes the Earth’s Mantle Flow?
07.20.2016
Geophysics By analyzing microscopic defects in the mineral that makes up 60% of the Earth’s mantle, researchers have uncovered what makes this solid rock flow.
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society article
A Bias for Women in Science?
07.29.2016
Education Why are women underrepresented in most areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)? A common explanation is that there exists a hiring bias against women in those fields. A new study says otherwise.
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society article
Who Built the Eiffel Tower?
07.13.2016
Engineering Since its construction, more than 120 million visitors from all over the world have marveled at the Eiffel Tower. Historian Bertrand Lemoine looks back at the career and achievements of its prolific builder, Gustave Eiffel.
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life diaporama
digital
The Science of Cycling
07.25.2016
Physics One of best ways for cyclists to optimize their speed is to work on their riding position. The French Cycling Federation recently teamed up with researchers to help athletes improve these cycling positions. On your marks for a performance optimization session with France’s junior cycling team at...
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